Saturday, November 16, 2013

Eli Nunn Civil War Letter


In the days of the Civil War, families were always anxious to hear from their family that was away in the war.  John Nunn, an early pioneer settler of Crittenden County who lived in the Bells Mines section, received a welcome letter from his son, Eli L. Nunn in 1862.  Eli was born May 24, 1842.  He was quartermaster in Company A., 13th Kentucky Cavalry, C.S.A.  The letter reads as follows:

September 4, 1862, Dear father, I am in camp near Paris Tenn., and living very well at present.  I have been in two fights and heard the bullets whistle. I have been in every skirmish since I've been out and I am ready for another one.  

Home is the best place in the world but I have got my foot in it now and I will stand like a man as long as I am able.

Pa, I'll say this to you if they do take your negroes away, I will come back if no misfortune happens to me.  Pa, as to my clothing, I have two shirts and two pair of pants, one suit of each.

Tell mother ot kiss John and sister for me, give the rest of the children my love and all inquiring friends.

I'll close my letter,  Yous truly, E. L. Nunn

 Eli and four of his children, Eli sitting on their front porch,  daughters, Nell, Mable and Eva and wife Maria, about the year 1899.  House was located on Hwy. 365. 
           
Eli Nunn did make it through the war and returned home to Crittenden County.  He married Maria Amelia Phillips, Nov. 24, 1870 and they had a family of eight children.

He was a prosperous farmer and well known and respected by all his friends and neighbors.

Eli and Maria were buried in the old Nunn Family Cemetery, not too far from their home.  Later their bodies and the bodies of Eli's parents, John and Emily Nunn and of their children, Harriet and Kittie Nunn, were moved to the Mapleview Cemetery at Marion.

1 comment:

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