Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Fords Ferry Road, August 1925


Here's is an interesting article found in the August 21, 1925 Crittenden Press.

FORDS FERRY ROAD GETS FEATURE PAGE STORY.

Courier Journal of Sunday, August 16, Devotes Page to New Project and to Historical Legends of Early Days.

In the feature section of the Courier Journal of last Sunday a whole page was devoted to our new Ford Ferry and Cave in Rock.  It said in part:

On a decision of the Illinois Highway Department, expected next month, hangs the hope of a large section of Western Kentucky for the early construction of an inter state highway which, in Kentucky and in Southern Illinois, will traverse a section as filled with history of dark deeds, romances, crimes, and unmentionable tales as the landscapes of the section are filled with midsummer haze. 

The road, which will connect the section through which it is to be built with concrete roads Illinois is building, now financed partly by bond issues totalling $160,100,000 and give to Southern Illinois a inlet to the Louisville-Paducah road, now under construction, will run from Hopkinsville to Princeton, Marion, Fords Ferry and Cave in Rock.

Mystery surrounds Fords Ferry.  The man whose name is attached to that Ohio river point remains a man of mystery after a century.

Historians are as yet unable to unravel his secret.  Legends ascribed to him the leadership of bandit in the section during the early years of the Nineteenth Century, but his character and life will ever remain in doubt - whether it was the whole truth or not.

Cave in Rock, which is on the Illinois shore near the ferry, is a most interesting point. About it centered crimes of which many early voyageurs of the Ohio river were victims.

The pirogue, the batteau and the flat boat of the early trader often found Cave in Rock thier last port of call, and the brave crews saw their last glimpse of earth near it's portals.

The bandits and pirates of Cave in Rock would have shamed Blackbeard and Jean Lafitte by their misdeeds.

The status of the road, is Kentucky's treasury will have no funds available for roads until July 1926.  The possibility of its construction before that time is to have it designated a federal highway and let the surrounding counties aid in the construction.  Mack Gailbraith, federal engineer in Kentucky, has recommended it as a federal highway on condition that it be so designated by Illinois.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Marion Graded School Building


Evelyn Graves wrote this about the Marion Graded School building in1926.

The graded school building stands on the corner of College and Carlisle streets, its front entrance facing the post office building and the side entrance facing the Methodist church.

The main part of the building was constructed in 1894 when Charles Evans was superintendent of the Marion school system.

The building was used for the first time Jan. 19, 1895 and in it seven teachers were employed.  Both the graded and high school were housed in it.

In 1904 the school district realizing that the new graded and high school building was entirely too crowded, voted bonds for an annex.  With this new section, the present auditorium and the class rooms above the building, now used for the graded school alone, the school was completed as it now stands.

The first high school class that graduated in Marion consisted of two, Edward Gray, now of Ardmore, Oklahoma, and Perry Maxwell, also of Ardmore, who graduated in 1896.  

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Some Early Crittenden County Pioneer Citizens


Here is some history and genealogy of some of our early pioneer citizens.

Crittenden Press, Nov. 9, 1903.

James Hickman Walker. 

He was born on a farm near Tolu, Nov. 14, 1827 and spent his early life on a farm.

As a young man he became associated with the government of the county.

He was appointed deputy sheriff of the county for three years and four months, beginning in 1851.

 He was elected sheriff in 1854, and re-elected in 1856. He was deputy U.S. Marshall in 1860, and census enumerator in 1860, taking the census of half of the county.

He was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court in 186t2 and served in this office until 1874.

He was a splendid official and served in each office with credit to himself and the people who elected him.  

James Hickman died June 16, 1906 at the age of 79.  He is buried at Mapleview Cemetery with his wife, Hortense Gregory Walker.  


Crittenden Press, Sept. 19, 1895

Robert W. Foster

R. W. Foster was born in Oldham County, KY., Sept. 7, 1817, and was a son of A. G. and Lucy Duerson Foster.  His parents came to Kentucky at an early day.

 Mr. Foster came to Crittenden County in 1852, and settled on a portion of the land he owned at his death.

He was a most successful farmer and at his death owned one of the finest farms in the county.

He was postmaster at the Hurricane post office for several  years.

He was never married and for years his widowed sister, Mrs. Threlkeld, has kept house for him.

He had a lovely home overlooking the valley of the Ohio and there surrounded by all that was needed to bring comfort to him.  

He passed away on Sept. 14, 1895 and is buried in Mapleview Cemetery.  His sister, Susannah F. Threlkeld is buried next to him.


Crittenden Presss, July 1896

Phineas C. Barnett

Phineas C. Barnett was born in Warren County, Ky., Feb. 16, 1809.  His family moved from Kentucky to Missouri, where he remained until he was 17 years old when he returned to his native state, and a little later he entered Cumberland College at Princeton.

In 1835 he came to what is now Crittenden County and settled on the farm where he spent the last 60 years of his life, located a few miles outside of Tolu. 

He had a love of fine horses and had several of these on his farm.  He was an industrious man of his day and owned a large amount of land and operated a successful farm and livestock herd of cows and horses.

In 1831 he was married to Miss Jeanetta Threlkeld.

Mr. Barnett died at his home near Tolu, on Friday July 24, 1896.  He was buried in the Barnett-Miles Cemetery located outside of Tolu on his farm.

The old Barnett-Miles Cemetery is located today on land that belongs to the J. T. May family.  It has been destroyed many years ago by cattle.  All the stones are knocked down and some even missing. 

The Barnett name today is remembered  by the Barnett Chapel's Church and also the county road that is named the Barnett Chapel Rd where the church is located.